Narrative Elements Posters! So excited to share!

What a week so far! I am plummeting back into the world of literature with my fifth grade darlings, and my students were so excited to see their new Literature Circle Reference Posters, as I like to call them. They've been in the works for a few weeks now, and have been tested this week. I refer to these during language arts lessons when we are skill-building, or when students are directing literary discussions about our newest favorite book or author during Lit Circles. (By the way, I was pumped up to hear about the new chapter books they received as gifts or from the public library over Winter Break, and they couldn't wait to share those titles with me.)  I am also thrilled at how often we've used these posters during our guided read-alouds! Model, model, model!

Click on the link to my store, or on any picture to find out more!

Protaga-what???? New vocabulary for the words "main character" can easily throw off even the most confident reader.

I love to partner-share about our favorite villains throughout literature (including movies) in order to cement this vocabulary term.

 Past, present, or future are relative terms for upper elementary students. Sometimes they just can't see that a story takes place in the "past", or, "present day". If it's not happening to them, then they have little care for it!  I find it helpful to ask simple questions such as, "Could this story (or passage) take place today?" or "Can you picture a time when this might happen? Could you be there, too?"

 This is what I like to call the GOOD vs. BAD comparison. In other words, good plus evil equals battle.
 I am always surprised at how quickly students grasp the concept of types of conflicts, once these types are introduced through a read-aloud.

 Giving students a bank of THEMES to choose from will produce higher quality responses. Especially when given the chance to bounce ideas off of each other, you will be dancing a happy gig with what they are capable of recognizing as the theme of a novel. Again, it's all about choosing a quality read-aloud to draw in the audience and capture their own genuine emotion to allow them to recognize it as a theme. They also get a kick out of writing their own themes. My students impress me daily with what they discover during our read-aloud!

I hope you find this useful!
PS I have a bank of read-alouds for upper elementary that are high-intensity and high-interest. 
Let me know if you'd like to hear more! 

Xo, 




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